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Keyword Search Results for:
wisteria

8 Found

Question: 156-5201
I have a Wisteria that is producing runners. Can I make separate plants from them? Barbara, East Providence, RI

Mort's Answer:
Vines of Wisteria will often find their way back into the soil especially, if they are not on a trellis. In the spring or early fall, when the leaves start to turn, you can sever the root with a spade. Simply drive the point down into the soil close to spot where the branch reentered the soil. Your new spot should be in a sunny location. If you make the cut in the fall, put mulch around the stem after you have planted it. Do not put any fertilizer in the hole.

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Question: 157-5201
I just saw a little growth on my Wisteria cuttings. When can I expect real growth? Maggie, Middletown, RI

Mort's Answer:
Wistaria frutescens, the American wisteria, blooms a lot later than W. sinensis, Chinese wisteria, or the Japanese, W. floribunda. It may take 4 or 5 years before you will see a flower. You can hasten the process by adding a handful of 5-10-10 fertilizer each year to the soil. You can further enrich the soil by cultivating into the surrounding soil some aged manure each year. The American does not bloom when the leaves come out as the Japanese and Chinese do.

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Question: 158-5201
If I were to dig up Wisteria and Roses at this time. How can I keep them until I plant them again in the spring? Joan, Preston, CT

Mort's Answer:
Since both can be dug out without a ball root, it is easy to keep them covered until spring. If you can get a ball, you can leave them upright in a sheltered area. Just cover the entire ball with sand. If there is no ball,lay entire plant on its side and cover just the root with sand. Cover the top of the plants with burlap to protect it from the wind. A sunny location is preferable but not necessary.

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Question: 361-1610
I am hoping you can give me so advise for my wisteria. I have already tried cutting back, and cutting after the tendrils have grown in the summer. I can not get my wisteria to flower. When I first planted it it did flower for the first year. Nothing since then only very green growing branches. Is there anything I can do to make it flower?

Mort's Answer:
Wisteria have many lateral roots that sprout. They weaken the main plant and usually will not set buds for five years. If you can maintain the original plant, it will set flowers again. Keep the soil around the plant cultivate to discourage new plants. Use 5-10-10 fertilizer once a year to supply phosphorus for the blooms.

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Question: 1187-4314
I have a wisteria that has only given me 15 blooms in 15 years. How can I get more bloom? Michele, Willimantic, CT

Mort's Answer:
Sometimes juvenile vines do not bloom for six years. Your plants could use some 5-10-10 fertilizer. You should also soak the roots before the first frost this fall. This past winter was a difficult time for a lot of plants in southeastern New England. A long winter followed by a cool dry spring resulted in a paucity of flowers on butterfly bushes, hydrangea and many others. Wisteria need help to climb and like the sunshine. Pruning back skimpy shoots in the summer will help. If your plants are in the shade, consider cutting them back and moving them to a sunny location. Asiatic species, W.sinensis and W.floribunda, are the most prolific. Native wisteria are reluctant bloomers but need coaxing with high middle number fertilizers very five years. Visit themagicgarden.com/library, which has more than a thousand lawn and garden Q&As. See our video, "Newport in the Fall." on our YouTube channel.

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Question: 259-5201
We have a wisteria that has not bloomed since we planted it three years ago. We have trimmed it because it is quite vibrant. How can we get it to bloom? Terri, Preston, CF

Mort's Answer:
You can only trim in the late summer. You may be cutting off the buds. You can add a hand full of bonemeal to accelerate the maturity of a somewhat reluctant specie.

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Question: 357-5201
I have a two year old Wisteria that is growing very well but it has no flowers. How can I bring it the bloom? Terri, Preston, CT

Mort's Answer:
If you have a grafted wisteria, it blooms the first year. Wistaria chinensis is a high climbing vine that has fragrant blue- violet flowers. It rarely blooms in the first few years but it is worth the wait. Few wisteria seedlings will bloom the first three or four years without a very organically rich soil.

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Question: 252-5201
What is the best way to pull out Wisteria? Paul, Brunswich, GA

Mort's Answer:
Wait until the dead of winter, when they are defoliated. This will make it easier on you. Be sure to label the trunks, while they are still discernible from the other plants nearby. Cut the top of about 3 from the ground in the winter. Then, you can dig out each root. You have to get to the root of your problem, otherwise they will come back to haunt you. There is nothing worst than wisteria coming back and causing hysteria. We will be continually adding new questions. Please check back with us later.

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