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Keyword Search Results for:
mushrooms

7 Found

Question: 73-5201
I have mushrooms in my lawn for the first time. I also have grubs. How can I get rid of the mushrooms? Richard, Wheeling, WV

Mort's Answer:
Your mushrooms are indirectly caused by the grubs. Decayed organic matter and an acidic soil will foster the growth of mushrooms. Your soil PH can be raise with lime. You can apply 200 lbs. per 10,000 sq.ft. of limestone in the fall or the same amount of hydrated lime early next spring. Grubs are eating the roots of your grass and the dying material is creating a haven for the mushrooms. A grubicide applied in the spring and/or the fall, when the temps are 65 degrees will kill the insects. Along term solution would include applying BT. This bacteria needs two or three years to establish itself to kill the grubs. Bacillus thuringiensis colonizes the lawn. You will find holes in the lawn as a result of the dying grass. You can top dress with new seed. It would be wise to start the grubicide program this fall.

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Question: 432-3410
How do I get rid of mushrooms in my lawn? Louise, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
If the lawn has not been treated with chemicals and they are the edible varieties, my uncle Herb will gladly take them out for you. Another solution is to add 200 lbs. of lime per 10,000 sq.ft. each spring or fall.. The mushrooms will disappear as the PH of the soil approaches 6.0. New England lawns prefer a 6.5 to 7.0 soil PH for optimum growth. This treatment is recommended for all New England lawns every year

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Question: 224-5201
My dirt cellar in my 100 year old house has now spawn mushrooms on the floor. How can I get rid of the fungus? Bob, Lebanon, NH

Mort's Answer:
Mushrooms as you indicated are fungi. They grow in damp dark areas, where the soil is acidic. This occurs naturally in New England soils. You can cover the floor with limestone and hydrated lime. Until you are ready to cover the floor with cement, you will be vulnerable to mushroom infestation. One alternative would be to turn the floor into a mushroom farm. You might consider growing the edible mushrooms and make the best of this situation.

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Question: 225-5201
We have mushrooms in the lawn. I used a herbicide without success. What can I put on the lawn to get rid of these mushrooms? Jeff, Taylorville, IL

Mort's Answer:
Mushrooms are fungi and not plants. Herbicides are for weeds. It is probably shady in that area. You need to apply 200 lbs. of lime for each 10,000 sq.ft. of area in spring and fall. You can use hydrated lime in the spring and limestone in the fall. This will raise the PH and eventually the mushrooms will disappear.

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Question: 226-5201
How can I get rid of some mushrooms in my lawn that are under a tree? Robert, Cranston, RI

Mort's Answer:
Mushrooms and other fungi flourish in shade. Adding limestone at the rate of 200 lbs. per 10,000 sq.ft. will lower the ph and remove the condition that produces mushrooms. Because this problem will increase each year ( although exacerbated by the exorbitant rain) with the increase in shade, you should apply this limestone in the spring and fall each year.

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Question: 451-3510
We have a great deal of mushrooms in our lawn. It is a relatively new lawn and we recently removed a few trees. Could this be affecting it? Walter, Waterford, CT

Mort's Answer:
No doubt. Rotting wood will promote fungal growth. Excess acidity will also cause the mushrooms to appear. You can apply 200 lbs. per 10,000 sq.ft. each fall and early spring until they disappear. New England soils are iron based and have a tendency to have a low ph. The lime will bring it closer to the 6.5 to 7.0, which is optimum.

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Question: 1369-3216
Can I grow mushrooms in an apartment? Kyle, St.Paul, MN

Mort's Answer:
It would be extremely difficult to control an atmosphere that would encourage mold growth. Mushrooms are best grown in the dark. Aged manure is very beneficial when mixed with peat moss. You will need a well ventilated closet devoted to its culture. If the other fungi develop, it could cause problems when they come out of the closet. You could build a cold frame outdoors and cover it with insulation and snow for the winter. You would have less environmental issues but a less probability of successful mushroom growth outdoors in the winter.

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