Call 855-660-4261 with your lawn & garden questions every Saturday from 8:06am to 10:00am ET. Then listen to Mort answer your questions. Or email anytime at questions@themagicgarden.com
Listen to the weekly archive 24 hours a day 7 days a week on demand.
Keyword Search Results for:
Rosa Rugosa

4 Found

Question: 144-5201
When can I move Rosa rugosa? Susan, Newport, RI

Mort's Answer:
All deciduous shrubs should be transplanted in the spring and fall, while they are defoliated. However, Rosa rugosa is the hardiest plant around your area. I would take a chance on a cool night with a section of the root and stems but not the entire plant in the summer evening.

back to top




Question: 145-5201
Should I cut back my Rosa rugosa? They are about 8ı tall. Marie, Charlestown, RI

Mort's Answer:
Although R. rugosa is the toughest rose, it could break in a severe winter. If you can cut back a couple of feet from the ends, you will be able to lessen the possibility of excess snow and ice overloading the branches. If there is any dieback in the spring, remove the blackened areas. R. rugosa has become naturalized along the beaches on the east coast. It is by far the hardiest and most disease resistant rose specie for your area. You could thin out some of the older canes and this will produce more flowers but it isnıt necessary due to itıs spreading growth pattern. You might consider turning them over every week or two and using them as green manure for roses. Roses and onions are the perfect companion plants. The onions will keep away insects and the diseases that they carry. As a green manure they will provide nitrogen. Roses do so well in California. Roses need cultivation and organic material. You will have a natural symbiosis. The scents from the onions and the roses will also provide additional pleasure for your senses. The three of you should do quite well.

back to top




Question: 461-3510
Can I grow Rosa rugosa from seed? Ann Marie, North Stonington, CT

Mort's Answer:
You can but it would be easier from cuttings. Another method is to take runners from the mother plant. This naturalized rose now grows wild from Maine to North Carolina. Rhizomes grow laterally and develope their own roots. These shoots can be cut and transplanted in the fall or early spring before the leaves arrive. Rose hips from the plant make excellent tea. Those hips contain the seeds. You would have to dry the hips to collect the seeds. This is a slow and tedious method compared to using the rhizomes. Cuttings of 6 or 8 inches placed in sand in the spring will root without hormone. You can plant the rooted cuttings in the fall.

back to top




Question: 345-5201
Can I grow Rosa rugosa from seed? Ann Marie, North Stonington, CT

Mort's Answer:
You can but it would be easier from cuttings. Another method is to take runners from the mother plant. This naturalized rose now grows wild from Maine to North Carolina. Rhizomes grow laterally and develop their own roots. These shoots can be cut and transplanted in the fall or early spring before the leaves arrive. Rose hips from the plant make excellent tea. Those hips contain the seeds. You would have to dry the hips to collect the seeds. This is a slow and tedious method compared to using the rhizomes. Cuttings of 6 or 8 inches placed in sand in the spring will root without hormone. You can plant the rooted cuttings in the fall.

back to top