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Keyword Search Results for:
Peppers

8 Found

Question: 256-5201
My peppers have produced no fruit yet. I used 10-10-10 fertilizer. They are leafy. What's up? Bill, Niantic, CT

Mort's Answer:
Too much vegetative growth from the high nitrogen imbalance. Add a small handful of bonemeal to the soil around each plant. It might not be too late for stuffed peppers.

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Question: 550-2211
For the last three years my neighbors and I have had no luck with Peppers. We get flowers but no fruit. What could be the problem? Brenda, Ronceverte, WV

Mort's Answer:
Soils in south West Virginia are heavy textured and shallow. This could cause root rot and there is not any energy left for fruit development . You should always rotate your crops between fruit veggies like pepper , and leaf vegetables and root vegetables. The last may be difficult in shallow soil. Another possibility is black snout weevil. It is about an eight of an inch and gets into the flower bud, Before the flower opens you can spray with pyrethrin , if you see them inside the flower. Next year move the plants to another area and dust the soil with rotenone, when you plant the plants or after the seeds have sprouted.

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Question: 619-3911
How can I extent the fruiting period on my chiltepin peppers? Can I bring them indoors now? They are in six inch clay pots and have ample fertilizer. Ann, Keosaugua, Iowa

Mort's Answer:
You need to bring them in now before a frost arrives. Usually peppers live for 120 to 160 days. You will need to supplement with additional light in a south facing window. If you can maintain a minimum of 12 hours each day, you can continue to harvest your plants. In the sixties these small two inch fruits on ornamental pepper plants were sold in the fall for winter picking. Chiltepin is a variety of Capsicum frutescens conides. These small cone shaped peppers can be very hot. I would be tempted to try to rest the plants around Christmas with 10 hours of light for a month to revive them at the end of January. You might consider planting some of seeds now, as well.

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Question: 761-2312
My red peppers are six inches but not yet red. Any suggestions? Bill,Tulsa, OK

Mort's Answer:
This year has been unusually early throughout the country for vegetable growing. Be patient. You may have nine inch peppers before they mature. If you are in a hurry, you can pick one and see how long it takes to sun ripen without the plant . Others may not be green with envy but you will eventually see red.

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Question: 947-2213
What is the secret to growing good peppers? I heard epsom salts will help. Susie, Lake City, IL

Mort's Answer:
Just a pinch of epsom salts with your fertilizer. It is a good supplement for compounds like 5-10-10. Peppers can do well in almost any soil. Like tomatoes and eggplant, they love hot weather. Do not put them out earlier than May 15 in zone 6. You will be rewarded in July when peppers will explode in size after the rains. Keep the plants free of weeds. I use a dust mulch. Loosen the top two inches of soil every 10 days. This will keep the soil underneath moist and keep out the weeds.

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Question: 983-3013
We have raised beds because the soil is so bony and dry. My peppers have been tipping from the wind. We are at 6800 feet elevation. What can you suggest? Shawn, St.John's AZ

Mort's Answer:
You can stake each plant. Use a cloth tie to hold them. You can break the wind by erecting a small two foot chicken wire fence. Use wooden stakes like lathing to staple the wire. Since you are in zone 6, you should be getting peppers for your steaks soon.

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Question: 1010-3713
I heard that If I can bring some pepper plants inside before frost, they can be rejuvenated and will produce earlier fruits next season and be more productive. Is this true? Do they have to already be in pots or can I safely dig them up and transplant them in pots to bring indoors? Bruce, Beaver Dam, KY

Mort's Answer:
Ornamental and hot peppers are hardy perennials and shrubs in frost free areas. You can bring them indoors for the winter. You can force more flowers by restricting the root. It will be an easier transition if you put them in clay pots outdoors for a week or two unless you expect a frost. They will need strong sun and a grow light for 12 hours each day. Flowers will need to be pollinated with a Q tip. Use a teaspoon of 5-10-10 fertilizer a week or two after moving in doors. Bell type peppers usually do not last and are not good candidates for extensions but it is worth a try. You can also let them rest without added light and fertilizer and plant them outdoors again in the spring.

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Question: 1271-2615
My peppers are loaded with flowers and some small fruit. I have three types. I was thinking of removing most the flowers. Any thoughts? Bill, Tulsa, OK

Mort's Answer:
Peppers do not need much fertilizer, especially nitrogen. In the dry climate that you had in early spring, they were stressed and produced the exceptional amount of flowers. You could strengthen the stems by side dressing with 5-10-10 to hold the fruit. You might consider picking a third of the bell type to lighten there load on the branches. I would let the others do their thing and just pay attention to the water amounts.

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