Call 855-660-4261 with your lawn & garden questions every Saturday from 8:06am to 10:00am ET. Then listen to Mort answer your questions. Or email anytime at questions@themagicgarden.com
Listen to the weekly archive 24 hours a day 7 days a week on demand.
Keyword Search Results for:
Pear Tree

4 Found

Question: 1255-1915
We have had a pear tree that has done well over the last 25 years. I am feeling guilty and apprehensive that my luck will change. Is there anything that i should be spraying for instance? Leon, Holden, MA

Mort's Answer:
You need not spray unless you have seen signs of pests or disease. Pear trees last a long time. You might entertain using some organic solutions, literally. An oil dormant spray applied in the fall or spring before bud swell will keep away potential egg laying insects. If you apply some 5-10-10 fertilizer sometime in the future when you see production waning will help extend your pear tree. You can dig about 10 holes in a circle with a crowbar at leaf drop range. Holes should go down two to three feet and be filled with the fertilizer. Do not feel guilty if you do nothing this year. This is not a bad thing.

back to top




Question: 860-4912
When can I prune my pear tree? It has not produced much if any fruit the past few years. It is 20 feet tall and about five feet around at the base. Frank, Westerly, RI

Mort's Answer:
If it is twenty feet tall, it is an old tree that needs a good pruning. If it is five feet around, you need to call the historical society and have it enshrined. I suspect it might be three feet around or less. You need to have five main stems to be the scaffolding to hold flower bearing branches. Remove all the upright branches. Aim to hallow out the center. Remove all crossing branches. You evan use to tree wax or Lexonite to cover the cuts. Flower bearing or secondary branch can be cut back to six to ten feet. This will strengthen all branches. You need to fertilize with a granular 5-10-10. Dig a dozen holes about ten feet from the base in a circle. They should be as deep as you can go with a crowbar. You will also need a spray program. You can use Neem as an oil dormant spray at any temperature now until spring. Most dormant sprays need to be applied at 65 in the fall or spring before bud swell. Use a home orchard spray in the spring. Follow directions on the label.

back to top




Question: 1242-2016
I have a five in one pear tree. I took suckers from the base and now have three trees about six to eight feet tall. The newer ones bloom earlier but have a small puny fruit. The older 25 year ld tree has not produced much fruit either. Any ideas? Lee, Alton, MO

Mort's Answer:
I suspect the root stock of your five in one is a male like Bradford Pear trees. Males bloom earlier and provide pollen for the female fruit trees. Those suckers grew but will not give you the big juicy fruits. That mother of a tree is getting old. You can help rejuvenate it with 5-10-10 fertilizer. Dig a circle of 15 to 20 holes about ten feet from the trunk. The holes should be at least 18 inches deep. Two or three feet down would be better. Fill the holes with the fertilizer. It could take 50 lbs. You might consider buying another female to take advantage of suitors.

back to top




Question: 1248-1515
My pear is tree is about eight feet. Can I broaden it so I do not have to use a ladder for picking? Bill, Tulsa, OK

Mort's Answer:
Pear trees tend to grow right straight up. Dwarf varieties are readily available. Older species can be pruned like apple trees. In Japan they have been doing this for centuries. You need to prune the tree on the inside and cut the ends of the branches. This will foster more spreading. Any branches that go straight up must be removed. This will require annual pruning to maintain its shape. You might consider espalier trees on a wall. This usually requires a lot of disbudding and pruning each year. In either case you will have larger, sweeter, nonpareil pears.

back to top