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Keyword Search Results for:
Geraniums

7 Found

Question: 305-5201
I have geraniums on the north side in flower boxes. They are getting leggy. Any suggestions? Lois, Niantic, Ct

Mort's Answer:
Geraniums (Pelargonium) need sun and they are reaching out to touch some. I would plant patience on the north side with ivy and other shade plants. You can add some bonemeal to strengthen the stems and flowers, if you can't move them.

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Question: 320-5201
I brought in my window box geraniums and ivy geraniums. Do they need to rest? Lee, Groton, CT

Mort's Answer:
They do much better with a rest. In the south there is no interruption during the winter. Both will do well, if you have a greenhouse without resting them. In the house, the Pelargonium peltatum (ivy) likes the cooler temps and an east or west window. P. hortatum likes the heat and a southern exposure. Rest them for thirty to forty days in the basement sometime this winter, hen they are not doing their best.

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Question: 532-1711
Some my farmer friends place their Geraniums upside down in their cellars for the winter. What is the best way to hold them over the winter? Bill. Tulsa, OK

Mort's Answer:
Some of my farmer friends in New England are also in zone 6 and do the same thing. You must remove all the soil from the plants before hanging them on a clothes line. Another option that I have used is to treat these tender perennials as a house plant . Place them in a sunny window and keep them watered infrequently with very little water. This will allow them some heat for the winter. A third option is to put the plant in a pot with the potting soil in some light in the basement and hardly water at all. I have used all three methods. They all work.

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Question: 959-2513
I planted some geraniums about a month ago in my flower box. I added about eight spoons of 10-30-5 to each plant and watered every day. When the flowers came to bud they turned brown and withered. Should I give them more fertilizer? Hal, Conoga Park, CA

Mort's Answer:
Definitely not! You burned the roots with the excessive fertilizer. Because a little does a lot, it does not mean a lot is a lot better. After you burned the roots, you tried to rot the rest. Remove the plants from the flower box and put them in another area without any amendments. Refill the flower box with good soil and add some new geraniums. If the soil comes with fertilizer, do not add any more. Water the plants thoroughly and do not water again until they yell Hal. Geraniums are often used on grave sites because they do not require a lot of water. Your super charged soil can be spread over a large area like under a hibiscus or oleander hedge. Do not light a cigarette near your enhanced soil before you dispose of it. (Just kidding).

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Question: 1133-2314
I have been taking in my geraniums each fall. They are beginning to lose vitality. Any thoughts? Bill, Tulsa, OK

Mort's Answer:
There are three methods of storing for the winter. Firstly, you can continue to feed them when you water them as houseplants through the winter. Secondly, you can keep them in a pot in a cool basement with little light. Water them infrequently to keep them barely alive. A tried and true method includes a dormant period. Shake off all the dirt from the plants, cut them back to a few leaves and hang them upside down on a clothesline in the basement. All three methods will help extend their life even the hanging. Eventually, like all good things, they will die on their own. I had some geraniums that I kept for four years with the second and third methods.

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Question: 1398-4716
We have geraniums that we brought into the house. We cut them back and they seem to be doing bell. Will they last the winter? Alan, North Kingstown, RI

Mort's Answer:
Pelargonium crispum is considered a tender perennial in zone 6. It can be cut back as you did to strengthen the branches and put in strong light indoors. It does not need a lot of water in the winter. You can take the whole plant without cutting back at all. Some leaves may drop with translocation. Some old timers will take off all the soil and leave half the leaves and dry the plant for the winter by hanging it upside down on a rope in a dry basement. This seemingly harsh treatment gives the plants another season outdoors come springtime.

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Question: 211-5201
I am planning on taking in my miniature geraniums and roses for the winter. Can you give me some tips? Frank, Waterford, CT

Mort's Answer:
They need a dormancy period in a cool dry cellar or entry way. An unheated cool glassed in entry is best. Water just enough to keep them alive through the winter. You can prune the rose in the spring, when it starts to send out new sprouts. Do not fertilize at all until they are put out again in the late spring. The geranium can be cut back now. Both are best left in their pots. Some folks do take the geranium out of the soil after removing most of the leaves. The soilless geranium is then hung upside down on a clothesline in the basement until spring has sprung. At that time the geranium is repotted into a sterile mix with 1/3 sand. It is easier for the plant to make a transition, if it is climatized in the spring. You will find that putting it out in the daytime only for a week or two will help it harden to the outdoor weather. In the spring, while it is being hardened, you can leave it in a south facing window. This will give them a head start. I would put them out again in the late spring.

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