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Keyword Search Results for:
Dogwood

6 Found

Question: 100-5201
We did not get a lot of flowers on our 10 foot Kousa Dogwood this year. There does not seem to be any sign of disease. Any suggestions? Marsha, Matunuck, RI

Mort's Answer:
New England suffered a damaging winter for a lot of plants, including Rhododendron, Mountain Laurel and many dogwoods. You could add some 5-10-10 to the soil to help produce more flower buds. Do not use a liquid fertilizer. Make a half dozen holes in a circle about three feet from the stem. Go down a foot with a tire iron or similar tool. Fill the holes with the fertilizer. This will be good for five years.

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Question: 285-5201
When is a good time to transplant dogwood? Francis, Coventry, RI

Mort's Answer:
If you wait until the maple leaves start to fall in your area, you can dig it up and move it. It would be better, if you just dig a ball and leave it until spring. You can move the dogwood to the new hole in early April. This two step method is better because the small fibrous roots are essential to a good transplant. New roots will continue to grow until the ground is fully frozen.

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Question: 286-5201
We have a dogwood that buds but doesn't bloom. I understand that dogwood needs to dry out. I water my lawn two or three times a week with the irrigation system. What would you suggest? Al, Attleboro, MA

Mort's Answer:
You could move the dogwood to an area that receives less water. I would be concerned about the frequency of water. You do not need more than an inch of combined rain and irrigation. My guess is that you have too much water. This could cause fungus problems in your lawn. You probably have some root rot on the dog wood. If you are getting an adequate amount of water in that area, you could dig drainage holes around the dogwood and fill them with sand. The holes would have to go down two or three feet at the leaf drop. I would recommend about 8 or 10 drainage holes. All soils need to have aeration. This is best done by letting the soil dry out. I would water only once a week, if rain doesn't cover the one inch. Another alternative is to allow the lawn to go into dormancy in the summer by not watering in July and August. This will too late to help with this spring blooms on the dogwood.

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Question: 604-3511
We have a 5 foot pink dogwood that isn't doing well this year. The leaves are all droopy. We have not use fertilizer. What could be the problem? Jerry, Galesferry, CT

Mort's Answer:
Anthracnose fungus has been wide spread this year. It only attacks the Cornus florida. Streptomycin injections have had some success in arresting the spread within a tree. You will find that it is less expensive to ditch the tree and purchase another specie. Cornus kousa has smaller leaves and lower growth. It has flowers that are more clustered with a pink berry. One variety, C. kousa chinensis, has longer flower bracts. C.mas has small yellow flowers in March or April. Cornelian cherry also has a red edible berry in the fall. It is pollutant resistant.

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Question: 788-2912
We have had a drought this year in these parts. I have a white dogwood that is all brown. What can I do to save it? Jane, Taylorville, IL

Mort's Answer:
If it does not have anthracnose fungus, you might be able to rescue the tree. Follow the directions above for shade trees. Fertilizing should not be done until the tree begins to leaf out again. You should also take about a third of the branches off. Cut them back to the next branch.

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Question: 1158-3514
Our pink dogwood was split near the base recently by a storm. Can I save it? Moe, Oakdale, CT

Mort's Answer:
It can be saved with a simple bolt and nut. Tying the top of the plant tightly with a cloth cord will relieve the tension at the base. Use a cork washer with the bolt and nut. You should also apply some tree wax sealer around the cut to discourage earwigs. As the tree heals and grows, the nut can be eased back to lessen the probability of being buried in the wood. When completely healed, the bolt and nut should be removed and the hole filled with tree sealer. Another way to save the tree would be to cut the smaller portion off clean and cover the open part with sealer. Cornus florida rubra is a grafted plant with white flowering root stock. Be sure to cut out any new shoots from the root. This could happen after the surgery.

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