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Keyword Search Results for:
Dahlia

4 Found

Question: 282-5201
What should I do with my dahlias for the winter? Jack, Old Saybrook, CT

Mort's Answer:
You can leave them out through the first frost. Sun dry the roots after removing the stems. Cut off any mushy roots. The largest clumps can be split at this time. Store them in kitty litter, new sawdust, peat or burlap in the basement. Temperatures of 35 to 50 are best. Dust with a fungicide to prevent mold. In the spring you need to wait until the warmer weather to plant. You can further divide at this time.

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Question: 283-5201
Can I bring in my dahlias now? Terry, Bolton, MA

Mort's Answer:
Dahlia experts prefer to wait until after the first frost for further energy. Allow the plant to sun dry after removing all the soil. Lastly, cut the stalks and store the tubers in sawdust or a brown paper bag in a cool dry place for the winter. Plant late next spring about 8 inches below the ground.

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Question: 284-5201
Last year my dahlia tubers were mushy. What can I do this year? Dorea, Pactchaug, CT

Mort's Answer:
It is a good idea to leave the dahlias in the soil past the first frost. Take off all the stems, small roots and dry them in the sun for a day. Wash them in a mild solution of chlorox. Dust them with Bordeaux Mix or Captan. Store them in new sawdust in a cool dry place for the winter, If you can not get new sawdust, put them in brown paper bags for the winter.

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Question: 1427-1917
I have some new dahlia roots that I want to plant far from the spigot. I know they will need plenty of water. Any suggestions? Cathy, Griswold, CT

Mort's Answer:
If you can find a bright sunny spot closer to the faucet, they will be better served. You should put an inch of sand under thee good loam to help drain those gorgeous plants. You could mulch them but they will do better with cultivation since you have a shallow water table in your area. You will need to dig them up every fall. Closely exam them for rot or other pathogens and cut those out at that time. Store the roots in straw or new sawdust for the winter. They can survive the first frost in the fall and will have an enlarged root as a result.

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